International good practice

INTERNATIONAL GOOD PRACTICE

shutterstock_66335011_green world INTERNATIONAL (2)Green filmmaking is well established in some international markets, although the UK is alone in developing an industry-specific Standard that is applicable to organisations of any scale, at any point in the film value chain (BS 8909). In the United States, the ‘Big Six’ film studios in Hollywood have shown unprecedented co-operation in the face of the shared threat of climate change – they have been working together to reduce waste and manage their environmental impacts. Several high profile films have claimed to be ‘carbon neutral’ including: The Day After Tomorrow, Syriana, An Inconvenient Truth and most recently, The Hobbit.

The Environmental Media Association has been working with talent for several years to educate them about environmental issues, and seeding scripts with ‘green’ messaging. and seeding scripts with ‘green’ messaging. The Production Guild of America has developed an online Green Production Guide which has useful tips for green filming in the US, and a directory of resources. New Zealand was one of the pioneers of green filmmaking, and Film New Zealand have relaunched their sustainability toolkit.

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WHY GET INVOLVED?

A recent study estimated that screen production (film and TV) in London alone produces 125,000 tonnes of CO2 each year.

WHAT CAN I DO?

Work with your colleagues at work. Together you can make simple changes.

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